Diesel News

Amount of Diesel Fuel Purchased Declines

According to Bloomberg Businessweek, the amount of diesel fuel purchased by U.S. truckers has declined more in the past 3 months than any quarter of the past 10 years, excluding recessions.  This statistic hits hard as the U.S. approaches the holiday season, meaning greater amounts of transportation of goods. The Ceridian-UCLA Pulse of Commerce Index…

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Diesel News

Diesel Fuel Shortage in North Dakota

  Approximately 50 diesel trucks waited for diesel fuel at NuStar Energy fuel terminal in Jamestown, North Dakota last week. The NuStar Energy location was reported to be the only fuel stop in the region that wasn’t already associated with gas station chains, which drove diesel trucks from all around to the terminal. The NuStar…

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Diesel News

University of Wisconsin-Madison Perfecting Dual-Fuel Engine

The University of Wisconsin-Madison Engine Research Center in conjunction with the UW Madison Hybrid Vehicle Team is working to perfect an advanced mixed-fuel technology that uses the advantages of both diesel and gasoline. Two separate fuel injections are used to create the gas-diesel mix.  Mixing these two fuels reduces how much energy is lost in…

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Tips and Tricks

How Diesel Engines Work

There are several differences between a diesel engine and a gas engine. A gas engine (invented by Nikolaus August Otto) runs on the Otto cycle; a method in which a vaporized mixture of gas and air is sent to the combustion chamber and is then compressed and ignited by a spark plug. Diesels don’t have…

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Tips and Tricks

Diesel Factoids

The term “diesel” was originally linked only to the type of engine.  It was not associated with any particular type of fuel. The inventor of the diesel engine, Rudolf Diesel, ran his first engines with peanut oil. Diesel fuel can be made from virtually any organic material (like peanut oil) if it possesses flammable properties. …

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Uncategorized

The Different Types of Diesel Fuel: #1,#2, and #4

Diesel fuels are broken up into 3 different classes: 1D(#1), 2D(#2) and 4D(#4). The difference between these classes depends on viscosity (the property of a fluid that causes a resistance to the fluid’s flow) and pour point (the temperature at which a fluid will flow). #4 fuels tend to be used in low-speed engines. #2…

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